Category Archives: Communications

WEEKLY DEVOTION PAGE THE Second Sunday after Epiphany – LECTIONARY 2, YEAR C (JANUARY 14-20)

Here is the devotion page for the Second Sunday after Epiphany, Lectionary 2 (January 14-20) – Year C. (Click on the words!)

NOTE:  There has been some confusion about the dates on the Devotion pages.  The dates are the range of Sundays that the pages are for.  If you are using these starting on a Sunday in the range, then you are using the correct one!  Read below for a longer explanation.

Did you miss a week? Go to the Weekly Devotion page to download past weeks!

Lectionary dates and time after Pentecost

We are working on developing a complete 3 year cycle of devotion pages for the Revised Common Lectionary.  To make this really work the pages need to be tied to the lectionary Sunday, not the specific date.  For most seasons of the church year this is pretty easy to do.  The First Sunday in Advent is 4 weeks before Christmas, every year, so the date floats around, but the readings are always the same.  It is similar for Epiphany, Lent and Easter.  The Second Sunday after Epiphany (Note that Epiphany dates have a range, too) is always the same readings, as is the Second Sunday of Lent and Easter.  Pentecost and the season after are different.  Unlike the other seasons where the first reading of the season is set, in the time after pentecost the last reading is set.  The readings for Christ the King are always lectionary 34 and Christ the King Sunday is always on the Sunday that is between November 20 and 26, inclusive of those dates (five weeks before Christmas).  This wouldn’t be a big deal if Easter was also set, but Easter moves – by as much as 5 weeks!  So the Day of Pentecost can be closer or further away from Christ the King, depending on when Easter falls.  So if the Easter is early, the season after Pentecost is longer, and there are more readings leading up to Christ the King.  If Easter is late, there are fewer.  Since the last Sunday is of the season is set, that means the early Sundays are not always the same readings.  For example – in 2017 the 2nd Sunday after Pentecost used the readings for Lectionary 11 (Easter was relatively late that year).  In 2018 the 2nd  Sunday after Pentecost used Lectionary 9 (Easter was early).  So, indicating which Sunday after Pentecost on the devotion pages is not clear from year to year – so we use lectionary numbers that are tied to a range of Sundays.

WEEKLY DEVOTION PAGE the Baptism of our Lord– Lectionary 1, YEAR C (January 7-13)

Here is the devotion page for the Baptism of our Lord, Lectionary 1 (January 7-13) – Year C. (Click on the words!)

NOTE:  There has been some confusion about the dates on the Devotion pages.  The dates are the range of Sundays that the pages are for.  If you are using these starting on a Sunday in the range, then you are using the correct one!  Read below for a longer explanation.

Did you miss a week? Go to the Weekly Devotion page to download past weeks!

Lectionary dates and time after Pentecost

We are working on developing a complete 3 year cycle of devotion pages for the Revised Common Lectionary.  To make this really work the pages need to be tied to the lectionary Sunday, not the specific date.  For most seasons of the church year this is pretty easy to do.  The First Sunday in Advent is 4 weeks before Christmas, every year, so the date floats around, but the readings are always the same.  It is similar for Epiphany, Lent and Easter.  The Second Sunday after Epiphany (Note that Epiphany dates have a range, too) is always the same readings, as is the Second Sunday of Lent and Easter.  Pentecost and the season after are different.  Unlike the other seasons where the first reading of the season is set, in the time after pentecost the last reading is set.  The readings for Christ the King are always lectionary 34 and Christ the King Sunday is always on the Sunday that is between November 20 and 26, inclusive of those dates (five weeks before Christmas).  This wouldn’t be a big deal if Easter was also set, but Easter moves – by as much as 5 weeks!  So the Day of Pentecost can be closer or further away from Christ the King, depending on when Easter falls.  So if the Easter is early, the season after Pentecost is longer, and there are more readings leading up to Christ the King.  If Easter is late, there are fewer.  Since the last Sunday is of the season is set, that means the early Sundays are not always the same readings.  For example – in 2017 the 2nd Sunday after Pentecost used the readings for Lectionary 11 (Easter was relatively late that year).  In 2018 the 2nd  Sunday after Pentecost used Lectionary 9 (Easter was early).  So, indicating which Sunday after Pentecost on the devotion pages is not clear from year to year – so we use lectionary numbers that are tied to a range of Sundays.

Children’s Sermon Lent 1C Lord’s Prayer series Luke 4:1-13

This begins a Lent series on the Lord’s prayer. There are elements of the Lord’s prayer in each week of the Lent readings in year C. This first one is on the portion that says ‘lead us not into temptation’. Another addition you could do with the Lord’s Prayer is learn some of the sign language and teach the kid the prayer piece by piece.

Preparation: Bowl or plate, real or plastic foods–healthy mostly and some junk food

20130822-223520.jpgGather the children up front with you. Have the bowl out and the food choices too. Say, ” So I have this bowl and all this food here. What do you think I should pick to make me full? ” Have the kids help some. Go through the choices and pick healthy ones and then be ‘tempted’ to choose the unhealthy as well. Say, “I could just eat the cookies, but not sure how healthy that is, or if they will keep me from being hungry…”

“So why is that we say we should eat dessert last?” Take answers. “Yes, because we know that the food that is good for us will help us grow, be strong and healthy and takes care of our bodies. We do not need cookies for that. So we have this ‘guide’ or ‘rule’ that we tend to follow that says we should first eat the healthy food. It is a guide that helps keeps us on the right track most of the time. ”

20130822-223633.jpg“Each week we pray the Lord’s prayer–have you noticed that? And in that prayer we say this “Lead us not into temptation”.  Jesus taught this prayer to us. And we hear today in the gospel how Jesus was in the wilderness and tempted by the devil to do things that would not honor God, to walk outside of the path that he was walking with God. When we pray this prayer, we are asking God to help us continue to follow Jesus, to make good choices, to stay on a path that keeps us healthy and strong. So it is kind of like our guide for eating healthy, but this prayer is not just about food. It is about how we live and make good choices. ”

20130822-223749.jpgLet’s say this part of  Lord’s prayer up to this part together. “Lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil.” (have them repeat) “Jesus help us to make good choices, to follow you, and to remember you are with us, loving us all the time. Amen”

20130822-223908.jpg+God is with you and guiding you+

 

 

FaithCross_WorshipHave a poster with the words “Lead us not into Temptation” Invite people to share their struggles: “Lead us not into temptation.”  Temptation is part of our daily life.  What are some common things that you are tempted by that you wish you had better control over.  Write them on the poster and say a prayer for God’s leading.

Ritual of Love Mark 7:1-8 Pentecost 14B August 30,2016

20130822-223520.jpgGather the children with you at the baptismal font. Ask if anyone knows what this is called? Yep, it is the place we baptize, we get the person’s, often a baby, head wet and declare that they are a child of God. And YOU can remember your baptism, or remember you are a loved child of God even if you are not baptized, by putting your hand in the water and marking the sign of the cross. Let them try that briefly. Then direct to sit down.

Baptism is something that we call a ritual. It is a practice of the church to say certain prayers and blessings over a person getting baptized and it is a ritual that you have you remember and mark yourself with the water. A ritual is something we do again and again and often it reminds us of something. So let’s think a minute. Are there any rituals you do every day? (take answers and lead them to things like brushing teeth, washing hands. getting dressed, eating, sleeping) Yes! Those are rituals that are a part of every day.

20130822-223633.jpgSo our gospel today from Mark is Jesus telling some church people that the rituals that they are doing are not totally helping them… hmmm, that is kind of confusing because they were doing what God told them, to keep wash their hands and to keep clean  and staying away from certain foods. But they were also angry with Jesus and his followers because they were not doing those things. Jesus says, stop. You are using these rituals, these rules to only honor God on the outside but your heart is not focused on love and care for other people. God gave these rituals for loving and caring for others, not for being angry or hurting them.

So if we use a ritual, like baptism, to say that someone else is not ok or not loved then we are not talking about God. God opens up love to everyone. Jesus teaches us today that the ritual is good for helping us remember and that God’s love is over and above any ritual and is for all people.

Now, the ritual of remembering baptism can be a part of every day too, anytime you use water–for a bath, a shower, brush your teeth, to cook or to drink, You can remember God’s love for you and God’s love for your family and friends and even people you do not know! Pretty neat, right?

20130822-223749.jpgJesus, you give love and ritual. Help us to share our rituals in love and teach others about your way. Amen

20130822-223908.jpgMay you know God’s never ending ritual of love

 

FaithCross_WorshipHave a hand washing station with a bowl of water, a little soap and some towels. Invite people to wash their hands while remembering God’s love for them. They could pray a prayer of thankfulness or pray for another person or simply recite the Lord’s prayer as they wash.